Hints and tips 2

I'm good at what I do... well I think so even if nobody else does.  But, I'm not a miracle worker.  If you find yourself arrested and remanded into custody and then I show up and persuade the Crown Court to release you on conditional bail: make sure you obey your conditions, especially when the judge has told you just a few days earlier that "if you break your bail conditions you are very likely to be returned to prison".

If you don't obey then expect to spend up to the next year in prison awaiting your trial.  It really is that simple.

Comments

  1. Some people are just fucking idiots.

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  2. As I often say in my reports 'clearly Mr x has not acted in his own best interests.' I'm assuming he does not suffer a learning disability of course.

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  3. I'm always interested in who the accused blames in these situations. Sometimes it's us police who caught them , sometimes its the judge who jailed them , sometimes its the brief who 'failed' them. It's never ever their own fault. Out of interest did your client have time to blame anyone for this unfortunate event? If so, who?

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  4. As a magistrate I see this so, so often. And in my court, the idiots rarely get anything other than remanded in custody. One of my colleagues, ispired by tales f house arrest elsewhere tried to impose a 24 hour curfew but was told he couldn't do that. he then changed it to 23 1/2 hours, but that didn't work either. So his defendant was remanded in custody too....

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  5. At least they get remanded round your way, they usually simply get bailed again with the same conditions on my patch. Keeps my arrest rate up though so it's not all bad.

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  6. London PC, usually you are right it's always somebody elses fault... except in this case where the defendant blamed only himself! He did have an good excuse for being late in signing on but I don't really want to put it on here since it's an ongoing case.

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  7. rex_imperator, in my area there was a trend for house arrests in PYO cases. The defendent would receive a curfew from around 4pm until 7am (to allow attendance at school) and would only be allowed to leave the house (where his residence condition stipulated he live and sleep) when accompanied by a parent, other specified adult or member of YOT. I had about 5 PYOs on that kind of bail package. Don't know if somebody has been told off, but they do seem to have died out.

    In fairness, it may also be because I don't go to the youth court much since that bail package was my idea to start with when I was faced with a young lad who really should have been going to secure accomodation and I trotted it out a few more times.

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